The 2014 Midterm Elections are arising within the USA so it’s time for yet one more installment of ‘Politics of the Animal Kingdom’. You’ll want to start at half …

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38 COMMENTS

  1. Shouldn't representatives be able to win multiple seats if they have more than 66% or 100% of the first choice vote? That way power is proportional to peoples preferences rather than being split to lower polling parties.

  2. This is mostly what we have where I live (It is called Hare-Clarke), but the number of votes needed to win is n/(v+1) + 1, not n/v (where v is the number of vacancies, n the number of electors)

  3. 5:42 Okay, so this sounds nice but it isn't nearly that simple. This is under the assumption that EVERY white tiger voter's second choice is the other tiger, which won't always be the case. So how do you choose which votes count for white tiger and which citizens have their second choice used as their vote ?

  4. When a candidate has extra votes, how is it decided which votes are the extra ones?

    Say you've got the following population with the given voting preferences.
    30% Tiger (Tigers > Owls > Gorillas > Monkeys)

    30% Lion (Tigers > Gorillas > Monkeys > Owls)
    15% Owl (Owls > Monkeys > Gorillas > Tigers)
    15% Gorilla (Gorillas > Monkeys > Owls > Tigers)
    10% Monkey (Monkeys > Gorillas > Owls > Tigers)
    Each species send a single representative except for the lions, who see running as a challenge to the lioness queen and don't want to insult her.

    Election Day comes, and we get the following first choice results.
    Tiger: 60%
    Owl: 15%
    Gorilla: 15%
    Monkey: 10%
    Tiger earns 40% of the votes, equally split between Tigers and Lions. However, these two parties have different second choices, with Tigers preferring their fellow nocturnal creature, the owl, and lions preferring the big and strong gorilla. I can see three possibilities, all giving different results.

    Scenario 1
    The Tigers, who have the closer relationship to their representative should be happy, so we go with the Lions' second choice. Gorilla gets a 27% bump, pushing them over the finish line. The lions, whose second choice was used, should still be happy, so the extra 9% of the vote from gorillas go to their second choice: Monkey, pushing the Monkey candidate 1o 19%. Owl is now the lowest ranked candidate, so we eliminate them, and Monkey wins the 3rd seat.
    Results: Tiger, Gorilla, Monkey

    Scenario 2
    The Lions, who chose not to run a candidate of their own, must have less of a stake in this election, so we go with the Tigers' second choice. Owl gets a 27% bump, pushing them over the finish line. The Tigers' second choice was used, but not the owl's, so the extra 9% of the vote from owls go to their second choice: Monkey, pushing the monkey candidate to 19%. Gorilla is now the lowest ranked candidate, so we eliminate them, and Monkey wins the 3rd seat.
    Results: Tiger, Owl, Monkey

    Scenario 3
    We split up the second choice votes proportionately, and both Owl and Gorilla get a 13.5% bump, pushing them each to 28.5%. Not quite at the finish line. We now eliminate the lowest ranked candidate, Monkey, and assign their second choice votes to Gorilla, pushing them over the finish line. At this point, we choose Owl as the 3rd candidate as they haven't been eliminated.
    Results: Tiger, Gorilla, Owl

    Scenario 3 seems to have worked out the best, but it's hard to say which scenario would be used based solely on your video.

  5. If there are 3 seats available, 2 parties running, 2 candidates from each party, what of some of the people from tiger party who voted white tiger would rather have silverback gorilla? How would we determine which votes are extras? What if there were 3 tigers running?

  6. One problem I have. In the two political parties, who decides which redundant votes go to the second choice? Let's say there was a third Tiger party and half the white Tiger voters have Tiger one as a second choice and the other half has Tiger 2 as a second choice. Where does it go then?

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